Liberty Courses

Learn your way! Choose correspondence or online high school courses. Your previous high school credits determine which high school courses you’ll need to complete your diploma at Liberty High School.

Can I Transfer Credits?
What Courses Do I Need?
What Courses Can I Take?

When you enroll we will evaluate any previous courses that received a passing grade, and if applicable, the credits will be transferred.

To graduate a total of 20 credits are needed and must include the following number of credits from the four core subjects:

(4) English Credits
(3) Math Credits
(3) Science
(3) Social Studies

The remaining 7 credits can be either core subject or elective courses.

The Vermont State Board of Education requires 20 credits for its High School Diploma. However, we grant full credit for all courses you have passed at your previous school.This can save you substantial time and money.

Course Descriptions

English
Math
Social Studies
Science
Exploratory

ENGLISH

(ENG101) READING COMPREHENSION

This course is an introduction to reading comprehension. The selected reading material covers a wide range of subjects, guaranteed to inspire an interest in reading.

What You Will Study:

Context clues, cause and effect, outcome prediction, word definition, fact and opinion, event sequence, detail recollection, main idea, skimming for information, and summarizing.


(ENG-102) ENGLISH MECHANICS

This course is an introduction to grammar and vocabulary.

What You Will Study:

The parts of speech, recognition and correct use of: nouns, verbs, adverbs, adjectives, pronouns, prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections. Punctuation, capitalization, word meaning, word choice, opposites, synonyms, verbal reasoning, verbal analogies, and sentence structure and completion.


(ENG-103) ENGLISH

This course is a continuation of (ENG 102). Emphasis is placed on the correct use of grammar and vocabulary, sentence structure, and sentence patterns.

What You Will Study:

Subject and predicate, subject and verb, modifiers, main clause, subordinate clause, subordinate conjunction, coordinate conjunction, sentence fragments, action verbs and linking verbs, comma use, and run-on sentences.


(ENG-104) WRITING

This course is an introduction to writing and is designed to help develop the skills necessary for writing interesting sentences and paragraphs.

What You Will Study:

Topic choice and development, capitalization, punctuation, sentences, parts of speech, spelling, paragraph structure and construction.


(ENG-105) LITERATURE

This course is an introduction to literature and literary analysis.

What You Will Study:

Read and analyze one of several books, such as:

A Red Badge of Courage
A Tale of Two Cities
The Call of The Wild
My Antonia
David Copperfield

MATH

(MA 101) MATH II

This course is an introduction to basic mathematical concepts and functions.

What You Will Study:

Place value, comparing, problem-solving, regrouping, addition, subtraction, estimation, multiplication, division, fractions, time, money, and management.


(MA 102) MATH III

This course is a continuation of (MA 101) and covers more complex mathematical functions and concepts.

What You Will Study:

Whole numbers, graphing, multiple number multiplication, divisors, quotients, subtraction and addition of fractions, decimals, measurement, and geometry.


(MA 103) CONSUMER MATH

This practical course identifies math in the everyday and details the effective use of math in regards to personal financial situations.

What You Will Study:

Earning money, payroll deduction, money handling, checking and savings account maintenance, budget preparation, property ownership, loan application, understanding taxes.


(MA 104) ALGEBRA I

This introductory course offers a gradual, progressive development of algebraic skills, concepts, and applications, through the use of meaningful real-world situations.

What You Will Study:

Formulas, equation, algebraic representation, ratio and proportion, linear measure, area and volume, algebraic operations, equations and problem solving, inequalities, graphing and linear measurement.


(MA 105) ALGEBRA II

This course includes a thorough review of Algebra I and introduces more complex algebraic functions.

What You Will Study:

Operations on real numbers, polynomials and algebraic expression, factoring and operations on rational expressions, first-degree equations and inequalities in one variable, linear relations and functions, transformation geometry, real numbers and radicals, the system of complex numbers, quadratic equations and graphs, exponents and logarithms, variation, statistics and probability, sequences and series.


SOCIAL STUDIES

(SOC 101) SOCIAL STUDIES SURVEY

This course offers an introduction to Geography, History, Economics, and Political Science.

What You Will Study:

Geography, people and regions, climate, the environment; World history, the rise of empires, democracy and independence, global interdependence; American history, the American Revolution, U.S. Civil War, reform, WWII, the Cold War and Vietnam; Government and Civics, state and local government, the Constitution, elections; Economics, free enterprise, supply and demand, the global economy.


(SOC 102) U.S. HISTORY I

What You Will Study:

American settlers: Christopher Columbus, The Spanish Exploration, The Pilgrims, English and French settlement. The building of a new country: Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, The constitution, The War of 1812, The Industrial Revolution and reform. The growth and division of a country: Independence for Texas, early westward movement and The Constitution.


(SOC 103) U.S. HISTORY II

What You Will Study:

Reconstruction, westward movement, inventions, working for reform, big business and unions, WWI, The Great Depression, WWII, The Cold War, Martin Luther King Jr., space travel, The Vietnam War, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), human environment/interaction,the Persian Gulf War, the Americans with Disabilities Act, global relations, and technological advances.
Primary Source list:
Up From Slavery
Twenty Years at Hull House
“The Communications Revolution”


(SOC-104) WORLD HISTORY

What You Will Study:

The development of civilizations and cultures in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and the Americas. Early human efforts and discoveries, from the use of fire, to the creation of the Internet. The human response to environment, the rise and fall of kingdoms, nations and empires, wars and revolutions, global interactions, and the nuclear age.


(SOC 105) CIVICS-PARTICIPATION AND CITIZENSHIP: THE OPERATION OF THE AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND THE RESPONSIBILITIES OF PUBLIC LIFE

What You Will Study:

Nature of Law, forms of government, people and the community, civic responsibility, norms for society, the political process and parties, the role of congress, the judiciary, and the president. How a bill becomes a law, the Bill of Rights and Living Constitution, active citizenship, public and foreign policy.


SCIENCE

(SCI 101) SCIENCE SURVEY

This course is an introduction Biology, Earth Science, Chemistry, and Physics.

What You Will Study:

The scientific method, the human body, extinction, the balance of nature, the environment, the atmosphere, pollution and recycling, matter, states of matter, conservation of matter, fermentation, sound, gravity, light, lasers, and nuclear energy.


(SCI 102) PHYSICAL SCIENCE

What You Will Study:

Force and energy: forces and motion, machines, energy transfer. Thermal energy and heat: temperature, transferring thermal energy and home heating systems. Magnetism and electricity: matter and electricity, current and electricity, using electricity. Light: the electromagnetic spectrum, reflection, refraction, light, color. Sound: noise and music, acoustics, communicating with sound. Matter: elements, chemical reactions, the periodic table. Radioactivity: radiation and radioactivity, detecting radioactivity, fission and fusion, nuclear reactors.


(SCI 103) EARTH SCIENCE

What You Will Study:

The universe: the planets, Earth’s profile and structure; Water: water and the planet, groundwater, the future of water. Air: the atmosphere, weather and climate, clouds and precipitation, winds and forecasting. Plants: photosynthesis and respiration, seed plants and seedless plants. Animals:mammals, birds and insects, amphibians and reptiles, fish. The human body: circulatory, digestive, respiratory, reproductive, and nervous systems. Health: diet, drugs, disease.


(SCI 104) BIOLOGY

What You Will Study:

Scientific Method and measurement, basic chemistry, organic compounds, cell structure and function, cell growth and reproduction, viruses, monerans, protists, fungi, plants, animals, classification systems, genes, chromosomes, DNA, genetics, the biology of the human body, biological rhythms, behaviour: innate and learned, the biosphere and biomes,ecosystems.


(SCI 105) CHEMISTRY

What You Will Study:

This course is an introduction to the study of Chemistry. This course offers a solid understanding of the fundamentals concepts of chemistry. Problem solving is presented logically one step at a time, with sample solutions to all types of chemistry based interactions and problems. This approach will prepare you for authentic (lab based) chemistry.


EXPLORATORY

HEALTH NUTRITION

What You Will Study:

Food health, your body, fitness, hygiene, disease, alcohol, drugs, and first aid.


CRITICAL THINKING

This course is designed to teach thinking skills that are helpful in developing the four stages of thinking: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application and Analysis.

What You Will Study:

Classifying, outlining and summarizing, comparing and contrasting; ordering, estimating, inferring, interpreting and communicating ideas; building hypotheses, drawing conclusions, testing generalizations, developing criteria, making decisions, and identifying values.


HUMAN RELATIONS

Successful people have many things in common-they have set and reached personal goals, they are sincere, determined, hard- working, and most important-they know how to relate and get along with others.

What You Will Study:

How human relations work, risk-taking, building positive relationships, attitudes and learning, productivity, and personal, social, and career life.